Mauritius

The day after arriving and we just made it in time for breakfast (that's why its looks so empty). This was to become a theme for the remainder of our stay where we just make it for almost everything. (Photo by Jenny)

Mauritius

As part of our honeymoon package we received a free spa treatment. I think Jenny was a bit unnerved by the fact that she had to get undressed in front of the male masseuse, but other that that it was a wonderful experience. We did later on realise that the fishermen walking by on the rock could probably see into the spa (There are no private beaches in Mauritius).

This is the entrance to the spa, and as usual my woman captured me taking a picture of her. (Photo by Jenny)

Mauritius

After another hard day of relaxing, it was time to relax at the main bar with a whiskey and a cocktail or more. Cocktails flowed freely in the evening with a wide selection available by just raising your hand. (Photos by Jenny)

Mauritius
Mauritius

A stunning sunset over the deck at the "quiet pool".

Mauritius

A view of the main pool where most people spent their time and where the main bar was located. This is also where most of the evenings kick off with pre-dinner snacks, cocktails, and entertainment.

Mauritius

A per our standard practice when visiting somewhere new, we left our foot prints.

Mauritius

The beach were exotic with hammocks and beach chairs spread around for a weary traveller to relax and appreciate the view. (Photo by Jenny)

Mauritius

A very lonely and solitary job. Guarding the diving dock. This is where most of the vessels docked to pickup eager divers on their journey to one of the many diving spots.

Mauritius

Sitting down for another scrumptious dinner at the more intimate side of one of the two restaurants at the resort. (Photo by Unknown)

Mauritius

Every evening dinner was followed by a live show. This ranged from Mama Mia, to a tribute to Frank Sinatra, to Show Girls. Each show was magnificent with almost all of the staff participating. (Photos by Jenny)

Mauritius
Mauritius

The volcanic islands of Mauritius are located about 800 km east of Madagascar in the Indian Ocean. Mauritius consists of the main island of Mauritius, the much smaller island of Rodrigues and two smaller groups of islands and reefs to the north and northeast of the main island. All islands are of volcanic origin and are surrounded by coral reefs.

The extinct volcano Trou aux Cerfs is said to be the origin of Mauritius.

Mauritius

We visited "First Fleet" which builds exquisite ship replicas. Everything is made by hand and the level of detail is absolutely amazing. A ship like the one in the photo takes about a year and a half to complete.

Mauritius

The Eureka house is a unique maison créole (creole house) built on the slope of the mountains in 1830. It is said that the last owner had 17 children from one wife. One of the grandchildren converted the house into a museum.

A replica of the extinct Dodo stands in the entrance to the main house. (Photo by Jenny)

The dodo (Raphus cucullatus) was a flightless bird endemic to Mauritius. Related to pigeons and doves, it stood about a meter tall, weighing about 20 kilograms. The dodo has been extinct since the mid-to-late 17th century. It is commonly used as the archetype of an extinct species because its extinction occurred during recorded human history, and was directly attributable to human activity.

Mauritius

A natural lake resting on an extinct volcano, Grand Bassin is considered by many devotees to be an extension of the sacred Ganges River in India. This natural lake resting on a volcanic crater is a place of worship for the Hindus in Mauritius.

This statue of Shiva stands at the entrance to this holy site. (Photo by Jenny)

Mauritius

On the wandering roads of the Mauritian midlands, we stopped over at the 100m high Chamarel falls. What a magnificent site, and we found some willing onlookers to take a picture so that we can proof that we've been there.

Mauritius
Mauritius

The vistas inland is as breathtaking as the coast. These were taken in the Black River Gorges National Park.

Mauritius
Mauritius

Continuing on the winding road we ended up at one of the other major tourist attractions, Chamarel (or 7 coloured earths).

There are a kaleidoscope of colours, ranging from green, purple, blue, red, yellow, ochre and brown, which geologists believe to be the result of weathering of volcanic rocks. Oddly enough, the soils are not washed away despite torrential rains and cyclones. A plausible explanation to this natural phenomenon reveals that the soils may be rich in volcanic ash.

Mauritius

We learned a couple of things in Mauritius. Firstly, if you are going on a boat trip and they ask you beforehand if you get seasick. Get off and wait until the next day or travel by road. Secondly, we now know that we definitely do not get seasick.

After Jenny's first ever snorkelling experience she was rearing to do it again, so we decided to take a trip to Bénitiers Island by speedboat. What an experience. There was a storm the previous evening and the seas where extremely rough.

As you can see I was very grateful to set foot on terra ferma again. (Photo by Jenny)

Mauritius

Here's my girl, looking none the worse, after our back breaking trip to Bénitiers Island.

I must say that it was worthwhile. The islanders quickly wiped up a delightful four course meal, and after relaxing in the sun for a while we went of to a mind blowing snorkelling experience.

Mauritius

And finally, a photo of my island girl. I truly enjoyed my trip to Mauritius with my stunning wife with whom I was fortunate enough to share all the wonderful experiences.

Mauritius